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Why Denmark

About Denmark

Denmark officially the Kingdom of Denmark,[N 9] is a Nordic country and the southernmost of the Scandinavian nations. The sovereign state is south-west of Sweden and south of Norway,[N 10] and bordered to the south by Germany. The Kingdom of Denmark also comprises two autonomous constituent countries in the North Atlantic Ocean: the Faroe Islands and Greenland. Denmark proper consists of a peninsula, Jutland, and an archipelago of 443 named islands,[N 2] with the largest being Zealand, Funen and the North Jutlandic Island. The islands are characterised by flat, arable land and sandy coasts, low elevation and a temperate climate. Denmark has a total area of 42,924 km2 (16,573 sq mi), land area of 42,394 km2 (16,368 sq mi), and the total area including Greenland and the Faroe Islands is 2,210,579 km2 (853,509 sq mi), and a population of 5.8 million (as of 2018).

The unified kingdom of Denmark emerged in the 10th century as a proficient seafaring nation in the struggle for control of the Baltic Sea. Denmark, Sweden, and Norway were ruled together under one sovereign ruler in the Kalmar Union, established in 1397 and ending with Swedish secession in 1523. The areas of Denmark and Norway remained under the same monarch until 1814, often referred to as the Dano-Norwegian Realm, or simply Denmark-Norway. Beginning in the 17th century, there were several devastating wars with the Swedish Empire, ending with large cessions of territory to Sweden. After the Napoleonic Wars, Norway was ceded to Sweden, while Denmark kept the Faroe Islands, Greenland, and Iceland. In the 19th century there was a surge of nationalist movements, which were defeated in the 1864 Second Schleswig War. Denmark remained neutral during World War I. In April 1940, a German invasion saw brief military skirmishes while the Danish resistance movement was active from 1943 until the German surrender in May 1945. An industrialised exporter of agricultural produce in the second half of the 19th century, Denmark introduced social and labour-market reforms in the early 20th century that created the basis for the present welfare state model with a highly developed mixed economy.

Denmark is considered to be one of the most economically and socially developed countries in the world. Danes enjoy a high standard of living and the country ranks highly in some metrics of national performance, including education, health care, protection of civil liberties, democratic governance, prosperity, and human development. The country ranks as having the world’s highest social mobility, a high level of income equality, is the country with the lowest perceived level of corruption in the world, the eleventh-most developed in the world, has one of the world’s highest per capita incomes, and one of the world’s highest personal income tax rates.

Geography

Located in Northern Europe, Denmark consists of the peninsula of Jutland and 443 named islands (1,419 islands above 100 square metres (1,100 sq ft) in total).[49]Of these, 74 are inhabited (January 2015), with the largest being Zealand, the North Jutlandic Island, and Funen. The island of Bornholm is located east of the rest of the country, in the Baltic Sea. Many of the larger islands are connected by bridges; the Øresund Bridge connects Zealand with Sweden; the Great Belt Bridge connects Funen with Zealand; and the Little Belt Bridge connects Jutland with Funen. Ferries or small aircraft connect to the smaller islands. The four cities with populations over 100,000 are the capital Copenhagen on Zealand; Aarhus and Aalborg in Jutland; and Odense on Funen.

The country occupies a total area of 42,924 square kilometres (16,573 sq mi)[3] The area of inland water is 700 km2 (270 sq mi), variously stated as from 500 – 700 km2 (193–270 sq mi). Lake Arresø northwest of Copenhagen is the largest lake. The size of the land area cannot be stated exactly since the ocean constantly erodes and adds material to the coastline, and because of human land reclamation projects (to counter erosion). Post-glacial rebound raises the land by a bit less than 1 cm (0.4 in) per year in the north and east, extending the coast. A circle enclosing the same area as Denmark would be 234 kilometres (145 miles) in diameter with a circumference of 742 km (461 mi). It shares a border of 68 kilometres (42 mi) with Germany to the south and is otherwise surrounded by 8,750 km (5,437 mi) of tidal shoreline (including small bays and inlets). No location in Denmark is farther from the coast than 52 km (32 mi). On the south-west coast of Jutland, the tide is between 1 and 2 m (3.28 and 6.56 ft), and the tideline moves outward and inward on a 10 km (6.2 mi) stretch. Denmark’s territorial waters total 105,000 square kilometres (40,541 square miles).

Study costs

Costs directly related to the study such as books are around 200€ to 300€ per semester, however materials can be bought cheaper from students from higher classes, or borrowed or scanned from the library.
Costs of living
Estimated cost of living depends on the city, and of course on the individual person. Accommodation, transportation, food and leisure activities costs are about 450-550 Euros per month. The average student wage is around 12-14 Euros per hour.

Accommodation

Most of the universities offer accommodation for international students at their dormitories (single or shared room), however the interest is high and we strongly recommend you to start looking for another option of accommodation.
Dormitories
Well maintained and furnished rooms with wireless internet connection, with shared kitchen (including the fridge and other facilities). In many campuses you will find a lounge with pool table, TV and various board games. Dormitories are a great place to get to know your fellow students and to make friends. The average price is around 200-250 Euros.

The residence and work permit

Every citizen has the right to come to Scandinavia. No later than three months after entering into the country, the citizen must apply for a residence permit, in most universities the application is made in collaboration with the university.
Job Opportunities
The residence permit allows to find a job and work during the week and weekends and summer holidays. It is a great idea to start learning Danish before coming to Denmark in order to get a better job, but you also have a chance to find a job without Danish.

IBA (International Business Academy) https://www.iba.dk/international
Business Academy Aarhus https://www.baaa.dk/
Zealand Institute of Business & Technology studyindenmark.dk/
VIA University College https://en.via.dk/
DANIA https://eadania.com/